Pictured: University of Edinburgh students celebrate Diwali

It never occurred to me I would be posting more than one image today, the first being the sad circus elephant taken in India.

The Bob the Cat photo followed closely on its heels along with the mannequin arms protest (you’ll have to see that one to get what I mean).

The image below is from a Hindu celebration firmly rooted in the customs of India.

However, it did not take place in India but at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland where students decked themselves out in colorful costumes and lights. Must have lots and lots of lights. It is a sparkling tradition.

University of Edinburgh students wear outfits adorned with lights, mirrors, and bells to mark the Indian Festival of Diwali in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Wednesday. The five-day festival of lights is celebrated worldwide by Hindus. David Cheskin/PA/AP.
University of Edinburgh students wear outfits adorned with lights, mirrors, and bells to mark the Indian Festival of Diwali in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Wednesday. The five-day festival of lights is celebrated worldwide by Hindus. David Cheskin/PA/AP.

ABOUT DIWALI

Diwali, or Dipawali, is India’s biggest and most important holiday of the year.

The festival itself gets its name from the row (avali) of clay lamps (deepa) that Indians light outside their homes to symbolize the inner light that protects us from spiritual darkness.

This festival is as important to Hindus as the Christmas holiday is to Christians.

Diwali was originally a harvest festival that marked the last harvest of the year before winter.

India was an agricultural society where people would seek the divine blessing of Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth, as they closed their accounting books and prayed for success at the outset of a new financial year.

Today this practice extends to businesses all over the Indian subcontinent, which mark the day after Diwali as the first day of the new financial year.

Source: National Geographic

What are you thinking?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s